Draper Motorcycle Accident Sends Two Men to Hospital

A motorist who makes a left-hand turn has a duty to yield to oncoming motorists. It’s the law. According to KSL News, this law was broken on March 24, 2010, when a vehicle traveling through the intersection of 123rd South and Minute Man Drive failed to yield the right-of-way to two motorcyclists and struck them as they were traveling through the intersection. Both men are said to have injuries to their backs and lower legs and were taken to the hospital. Police are deciding whether the woman will get a ticket or not.

 

Video Courtesy of KSL.com.

First of all, best wishes to these two men as they recover from this totally preventable motorcycle accident. Unfortunately, too many motorists fail to yield when they make a left-hand turn. Since the failure to yield is a violation of Utah law, I am not sure why the woman would not get a ticket for causing the Draper motorcycle accident to happen. I happen to have likewise been a victim of a driver who failed to yield when making her left turn at this very intersection.

The motorcyclists should keep in mind that most motorcycle policies don’t have the regular PIP, or Personal Injury Protection benefits that drivers of cars do. So unless they purchased additional med pay coverage for their bikes, there may be no money on their policy to pay for medical bills. Typically, this med-pay component will pay up to $3,000. Hopefully both men have health insurance that will cover these medical expenses. Of course, a claim can and should be made against the at-fault driver in this case for the amount of medical bills, time off of work, any permanent impairment, etc. If the woman did not have enough in insurance coverage, then the men could look to their own policy for “under-insured” coverage.

Ron Kramer is a Utah motorcycle accident attorney with an office just a few blocks east of this intersection.

The Kramer Law Group does not currently represent any of the parties referenced in the article at the time it was written. We have cited and linked to the source of our information. If you were involved in the above incident, or one like it, and have questions about your rights and possible remedies, you may call us or another reputable American fork, Utah personal injury law firm. Do not act based on the above information without getting a consultation. The best personal injury law firms will offer a free consultation. We offer a free and confidential consultation to those (and their family members) not substantially at fault in causing their accident. The information and opinions expressed above are provided as a public service and should not be used in place of legal advice from a qualified Utah personal injury attorney.

Ron Kramer is a Utah personal injury and accident lawyer practicing throughout the state. Call the Kramer Law Group today at 801-666-3959 for a free consultation if you are in need of a Utah motorcycle accident attorney.

Lindon Motorcycle Accident Leaves Man in Critical Condition

An SUV and motorcycle collision in Lindon, Utah seriously injured one person on Tuesday, March 2, 2010. According to the Salt Lake Tribune, this Utah motorcycle accident happened around 12:10 a.m., near 700 North and State Street in Lindon, Utah.

According to Lindon police, the driver of the SUV, a 19-year-old Pleasant Grove woman, made a left turn into the path of the 29-year-old motorcyclist from Provo, Utah. The accident left the motorcycle driver in serious condition. The SUV driver allegedly told police that she took a quick look at her watch before she made the left turn onto 700 North. She didn’t notice the motorcyclist coming from the south side of the street. The driver of the motorcycle was able to lay down his motorcycle, but still clipped the front fender of the SUV. The biker was not wearing a helmet at the time of the crash and officials are not sure how fast he was going.

Emergency personnel responded and transported the motorcycle driver by helicopter, to Utah Valley Medical Center. He suffered serious chest and leg injuries. At the time of this report, no citations had been given.

I wish the man the very best as he recovers.

Unless the biker was found to be going an excessively high speed, the driver of the SUV will probably be found to be at-fault for this accident. She has a obligation to yield when making a left turn. The driver of the motorcycle will have a claim against the at-fault parties insurance. If the woman was actually texting as she made her turn, things will be much worse for her under Utah’s new texting statute which imposes minimum criminal penalties for those that injure another while they text and drive. Further, the woman is exposed to punitive damages for her role in causing this crash to occur.

Ron Kramer is a Utah personal injury and accident lawyer practicing throughout the state. Call the Kramer Law Group today at 801-666-3959 for a free consultation if you are in need of a Utah motorcycle accident attorney.

Motorcycle Accident Takes Life of Payson Woman

Payson, Utah resident Karen Baker, 53 years old, died in a motorcycle accident while riding with her husband in California on January 1, 2010. According to the Salt Lake Tribune, Ms. Baker was passenger on the motorcycle, which was being driven by her husband, just west of Lucerne Valley on Highway 18, when a car slowed in front of them to make a left-hand turn. Six other motorcycles in front of them, also slowed.

According to reports, her husband didn’t see the lead car and trailing motorcycles slowing down and veered off the road to avoid impacting them. He subsequently lost control of their 2008 Harley Davidson, causing the two of them to be thrown from the motorcycle. Although Karen Baker had a helmet on, it came off during the impact and she was pronounced dead at the scene. Her husband, Colton Baker, luckily suffered only minor injuries. She is survived by her husband, her parents, four children and five grandchildren.

My condolences go out to Karen’s husband and her family following this tragic motorcycle accident. It sounded like the two were out for a nice new year’s day drive when this happened. If there is anything to be learned from this crash, it would include the importance of always scanning the road in front of you and looking for hazards or changing traffic patterns and making sure when you ride, that your motorcycle helmet is securely fastened.

In this case, and based on the news account, it would appear that the parents and children of Karen Baker would be able to make a claim on the insurance policy taken out on the motorcycle. There also may be a possible claim against the car that initially slowed, if the driver of that car did so overly-abrubtly.

Ron Kramer is a Utah personal injury and accident lawyer practicing throughout the state. Call the Kramer Law Group today at 801-666-3959 for a free consultation if you are in need of a Utah motorcycle accident attorney.

Fatal Utah Motorcycle Accidents on the Rise

The Utah Highway Patrol announced today, August 13, 2009, an alarming increase in the number of Utah motorcycle accidents. According to the UHP, there have been 21 fatal motorcycle accidents in Utah since May of this year. And 5 of those have occurred in the past 2 weeks. The UHP says that several of these deadly Utah motorcycle crashes involved riders who were not wearing a helmet.

In 2008, there were 35 Utah motorcycle deaths reported. The year before in 2007, there were 34 motorcycle fatalities. It seems that motorcycle deaths have risen sharply given the recent increase in Utah motorcycle deaths. If this recent trend were averaged for the year, this would amount to 84 motorcycle deaths in Utah. Of course, there are many more riders on Utah’s roads in the warmer months than when there is snow and ice on the road.

Partially to blame for the increased amount of deaths is the dramatic increase in the sales of motorcycles and scooters in Utah. According to some reports, sales have increased by 300% over a year ago. There are many parking lot vendors selling scooters to whoever will pay $795 or above for their motorized, two-wheeled transportation. No safety class is required for anyone purchasing one of these. As a result, there has been an increase in the number of inexperienced scooter and/or motorcycle riders on Utah’s roads.

I therefore applaud the UHP for their efforts in getting the word out of the dangers of riding a motorcycle and/or scooter and that motorcycle and scooter riders need to take safety courses to protect themselves as they travel down Utah’s roads. Utah motorcycle dealers are also getting involved, with Salt Lake Harley Davidson publicizing a motorcycle safety course that they offer.

Ron Kramer is a Utah personal injury and accident lawyer practicing throughout the state. Call the Kramer Law Group today at 801-666-3959 for a free consultation if you are in need of a Utah motorcycle accident attorney.

Utah Motorcycle Accident Kills One

Pamela Gronning was riding as a passenger on a motorcycle when the bike collided with a deer in Millard County. The accident happened on Sunday, August 10th, 2009. 50 -year-old Gronning, from Sheridan, Montana was on a 2007 Harley Davidson riding north on State Road 257 when the motorcycle hit a deer causing the bike to slide 200 feet. The Salt Lake Tribune reports that both Gronning and the driver were wearing helmets but Gronning still suffered such severe head injuries that she was pronounced dead at the hospital. The driver escaped with minor injuries.

 

Video Courtesy of KSL.com.

Deer and other wildlife present a serious danger to Utah motorists. The impact of a collision with a deer can be substantial for someone in a vehicle and often proves fatal for motorcyclists. I offer my sincere condolences for the Gronning family as they attempt to recover from this tragic loss.

Ron Kramer is a Utah personal injury and accident lawyer practicing throughout the state. Call the Kramer Law Group today at 801-666-3959 for a free consultation if you are in need of a Utah motorcycle accident attorney.

Motorcyclist Dies in Utah Motorcycle Crash in Garfield County

48 year old, Robert W. Adkins was driving on a Harley-Davidson Super Glide east on State Road 12 on June 23, when a westbound Honda Accord started to turn left about one-half mile from Highway 89. Adkins attempted to slow down as the Honda Accord pulled out in front of him but unfortunately could not avoid the collision. His bike tipped onto the side and hit the right rear passenger door. He was rushed to Garfield Memorial Hospital where he died.

The Salt Lake Tribune reports that Adkins had just finished his master’s degree from Southern Utah University and recently started a job as a counselor. I wish my condolences to the Adkins family as they grieve this loss.

Drivers making left hand turns have the duty under Utah law to yield to other vehicles, including motorcycles. If they don’t and someone is injured or killed, then they are responsible for all the harms and losses that follow. In this case, it appears that the driver of the Honda failed to yield to Mr. Adkins and the crash resulted. His “wrongful death heirs,” which would include his children, his wife (if married) and his parents (if alive), therefore have a claim against this driver.

I would recommend that his family contact an experienced Utah wrongful death lawyer to advise them of their legal options and remedies.

Ron Kramer is a Utah personal injury and accident lawyer practicing throughout the state. Call the Kramer Law Group today at 801-666-3959 for a free consultation if you are in need of a Utah motorcycle accident attorney.

Motorcyclist Dragged 50 Feet in Midvale Accident

A motorcycle driver was wedged under a pickup truck on Midvale’s Center Street at about 7720 South and 175 West at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, May, 20. The motorcycle driver was going the speed limit when an oncoming pickup truck didn’t see him and made a left turn right in front of him. He could not avoid the accident so he attempted to lay down the bike to minimize the crash.

The motorcycle rider, 52-year-old Robert Horn was wedged under the truck and dragged 40 to 50 feet reports KSL News. He sustained chest and head injuries but police officers say that the helmet he was wearing saved his life. Horn was taken to an Intermountain Medical Center in critical condition. His condition has since been upgraded to serious condition.

The driver of the pickup will likely be cited for failure to yield. He was not injured in the Utah motorcycle accident.

My take on this is that the driver of a motor vehicle has the obligation to keep an eye out for other traffic and to not turn left unless it can be done so safely. He really has no excuse in this case. As such, Mr. Horn has a claim against the driver and/or his insurance as well as a possible claim for under-insured coverage under his own insurance policy. Best wishes to Mr. Horn for a speedy recovery.

Ron Kramer is a Utah personal injury and accident lawyer practicing throughout the state. Call the Kramer Law Group today at 801-666-3959 for a free consultation if you are in need of a Utah motorcycle accident attorney.

Midvale Motorcycle Accident Leaves Man With Brain Injury

A motorcyclist was hospitalized after slamming into a parked car in Midvale on April 29. The driver crashed into the back bumper of a parked car at 10pm near 900 West and 7700 South. Witnesses heard the crash and saw the motorcycle but didn’t see a driver, reports KSL news. “They came down to investigate, originally thought there was no one there, but looked under the car and saw the victim,” said Sgt Chad Egan of the Midvale Police Department.

Witnesses called 911 and just as emergency crews came the man regained consciousness. He was rushed to the hospital with serious head injuries. The man was not wearing a helmet but other details of the crash are under investigation. Police suspect alcohol was a factor but it is unknown if it actually was.

From the sound of this report, I don’t think this man will be able to find a Utah motorcycle accident attorney or lawyer to help him, since it sounds like the crash is his fault! In Utah, if you are 50 percent or more at fault, you don’t have a case.

I don’t know all of the details of this case, but I do know that when riding a motorcycle, wearing a helmet can be life saving. This man sustained severe head trauma that may have been lessened by use of a helmet. Although helmet use has risen, the U.S. Department of Transportation reports only 51 percent of motorcyclists wear a helmet. Motorcycle helmets reduce the likelihood of a crash fatality by 37 percent! People have many reasons not to wear a helmet, but really the risk is far too great. Use your head: Wear a helmet!

Ron Kramer is a Utah personal injury and accident lawyer practicing throughout the state. Call the Kramer Law Group today at 801-666-3959 for a free consultation.